Doctor Deity

Moving one step closer to godhood.

And, no, this didn’t happen in the Netherlands, it happened in Colorado.

I just wonder how bad it has to get before there is outrage.

Hurdle 1: ignorance (no idea that such things are happening).
Hurdle 2: apathy (it doesn’t affect me).
Hurdle 3: denial (we’re not falling down the slippery slope).
Hurdle 4: acceptance (there’s nothing I can do about it).
Hurdle 5: the new world order (it’s better for us all).

There is no middle ground, folks. Either human life is precious, or it’s not. Once we start equivocating over the beginning and end of life or personhood for others, we will begin to see that scope getting wider. Think I’m being silly? When was the last time you saw a child with Down’s Syndrome, especially compared to how many you saw 20 years ago? Almost all babies diagnosed with Down’s are aborted. The few you might see either missed diagnosis or were lucky enough to have pro-life parents. How long before parents are encouraged to go ahead and have that baby with Down’s so that her kidneys or other organs can be given to another child? Wouldn’t that be such a noble act?

11 thoughts on “Doctor Deity

  1. Wow. Those last 2 lines blew my mind. Thank you.

  2. I had never thought about not seeing many Down’s Syndrome babies. When I was a teen they were plentiful. But, you’re right, I rarely see anyone younger than 5 years younger than me. That’s about when they started screening.I refuse screening. The fact is that I wouldn’t about thaat precious baby, no matter what was wrong with it. Why, then, should I get screening? And when you refuse screening, the doctors really pressure you to get it. I’m assuming people have changed their minds. But, really, I was “diagnosed” with Chlamydia 6 years into my marriage. I informed them there was no way I had Chlamydia and they redid the test twice because the doctor was <>more<> surprised that the second test came back negative than that the first came back positive.It makes you wonder how many of these babies are aborted for “no” reason. I <>know<> there have been cases when the parents have been told to abort because the baby had no chance at survival and then the baby was absolutely fine.

  3. That was a heartbreaking story. It makes me wonder about whether organ donation is such a good idea, considering some doctors seem so willing to exploit the helpless.I also refuse prenatal screening. With our latest one I was 38 and a midwife actually berated me for refusing screening and genetic counseling, telling me they were really counting on the results of said testing. Were they!?

  4. Wow. I’m stunned.My cousin and his wife have a Down baby (well, she’s about two now, so not so babyish) and she’s a hoot from all I hear (I’ve not met her yet)But, it was a missed diagnosis.

  5. What kinds of people kill a newborn baby like that? I’m horrified. More so because I can completely visualize the whole scenario leading up to that point. Because I know how doctors pressure patients into doing what the doctors think they ought. Because I know that those doctors are often either misinformed themselves or knowingly withholding certain information from their patients. But these are babies. What kinds of people must they be to just kill a newborn child like that?

  6. To take a life for the sake of saving other is not right. And, like Kristina, I hadn’t really given much thought to how much more I saw children with Down’s Syndrome growing up, compared to what I do now. It frightens me to think what this world is coming to. Nothing is sacred. Not even life itself.

  7. To take a life for the sake of saving other is not right. And, like Kristina, I hadn’t really given much thought to how much more I saw children with Down’s Syndrome growing up, compared to what I do now. It frightens me to think what this world is coming to. Nothing is sacred. Not even life itself.

  8. Sorry to post twice. I’m on drugs from some outpatient surgery yesterday. šŸ™‚

  9. That study cited that 58% of babies with Klinefelter’s Syndrome were aborted. My nephew has Klinefelter’s and other than some speech issues and future fertility questions, he is perfectly “normal.” I just don’t get it.

  10. It seems we keep hearing about more and more cases where the doctors are in such a hurry to remove the donor’s organs that they don’t even wait to really determine if the person is dead. I heard a story on the radio about a man waking up on the operating room table right before his organs were removed. He had been declared dead. It makes a person not want to be an organ donor, so no one rushes them through death.The fact that most babies with down-syndrom are aborted is a very sick fact. And screening for it is so routine now. I always get strange looks when I refuse screening. And because we also don’t find out the sex of the baby, we’ll tell people that it doesn’t matter to us, but they’ll say, “As long as the baby is healthy, right?” I think that’s the wrong attitude, and have started responding with, “Even then, it wouldn’t matter. I’d love my baby the same if he/she was born not healthy.” This kind of thinking is so common place in our “culture of death”. It’s overwhelming sometimes knowing how much needs to be changed, but taking these small steps, even in normal dialog with others is where it starts.

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